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Tag Archives: hippies

A Most Propitious Phone Call

Green Power Button

With Some of my Cotto Salami

I just had the coolest thing happen. Two days ago, I posted an entry to my blog talking about the book I’m working on and mentioning some of the organizations and people I’d worked with. One of those organizations was the Peace Action Council. Today, a person from my past was searching for info (for what reason I’m not certain) on the PAC and my blog post came up.

I had been involved with the Griffith Park Love-Ins (those were the daze my friends), which were organized by an group called Green Power and led by a gentleman named Cleo. One of the things I did for them was donate lunch meat for sandwiches to feed the crowds. This was in the late sixties. I have at least one interesting story my phone conversation with him brought back.

Anyway, this person from my past reached out and wants to help in any way he can. His name is Aron Kay, a close friend of Abbie Hoffman’s and somewhat infamous cream pie thrower, having pied many notables such as William F. Buckley and Phyllis Schlafly.

He remembered me a little better than I remembered him, but it turns out he’s remained in contact with a lot of the people I need to talk to, including Ron Kovic and many members of the Vietnam Veterans Against the War. He’s also remained a Yippie all these years and appears to have played a prominent role in efforts to legalize pot in NY. I did not expect to hear from someone with whom I shared experiences this soon . . . at least not via my blog. Thank you, Internet and social media for making this possible.

I know I have a long road ahead of me, but this is very encouraging. He believes a lot of people are anxious to have this story told. I hope he’s right. I’m going to need a lot of help. Old brain cells aren’t quite what they used to be and sometimes my memory, which has always been pretty good, is like a steel sieve. Also, although I have ideas about issues I wish to address, I want to have – and provide – access to lots of different voices. Although I’ll tell a lot of it through my eyes, it’s not just my story. It’s really the story of millions, many of whom sacrificed a great deal for their principles. It’s for them I want so much to tell this story.

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Teach, Learn, Share

The following is from a post I published in LinkedIn, in response to an emailed request from Dan Roth, Executive Editor. They implied I’m an “influencer”. How could I resist?


Giving advice to young people beginning their professional careers is not something I’m generally asked to do. How does someone whose background and experience is as unconventional as mine even relate to others who have already gone a different route? You just finished earning a Bachelor’s Degree. I never attended undergraduate school. What can I say to you that will make any sense? Nevertheless, LinkedIn has suggested I give it a shot and even ensure my thoughts stand out by tagging them with #IfIWere22, so here goes.

Twenty-two! Whew. That was 45 years ago. I have a hard time even being certain what I remember from back then actually happened. By that age I had already been in the US Navy (medically discharged after a short stint), owned a small business, lived on the streets of the Haight-Ashbury district in San Francisco during the waning days of the Summer of Love, and the North Campus district above the University of California at Berkeley after that.

By all measures of the time, I was a failure. I had nothing to show for those years save a hell of a lot of street smarts. How does one put that on a résumé? I did manage to get a job at a jewelry manufactory, where I learned to melt . . . er . . . solder gold and silver, making some very high quality jewelry, but it surely wasn’t a career I was interested in pursuing. In the next few years I had lots of jobs, but no career to speak of.

Law School Graduation

Don’t take life too seriously.

At 26, despite having no undergraduate education and never having taken the SAT, I was able to attend an accredited Law School, largely because I scored very high on the LSAT and after my first year easily passed the First Year Law Student’s Exam. It was not required of those who had their Baccalaureates. I received my Juris Doctorate in 1976.

I was lucky. I had some resources at my disposal and I had always been an avid reader and a self-learner – an autodidact. After graduating Law School I realized I didn’t much care for the legal profession and, coupled with my father having a major heart attack, I felt I had no choice but to join my family’s wholesale food distribution business. For the next 12 years I worked with my family and in several different jobs and businesses. You can see my profile for yourself. This is LinkedIn, after all. 🙂

Now . . . the question remains, what did I learn and what can I pass on to you as you begin your career? One thing, probably, is you don’t want to do what I did. However, there are at least two very important things I think brought me to where I am today (btw – check out my last job before retirement. It was a doozy), which isn’t wildly successful, but has given me a considerable amount of satisfaction.

First, don’t ever stop learning. Read, experience, experiment, test, and share. Learn so you can share what you know with others. It is the best way, IMO, to move forward. Too many people try and create a persona for themselves they hope will be perceived as irreplaceable. Don’t be one of them. Your value is in sharing knowledge, not hoarding it. You will be much happier because you won’t be constantly looking over your shoulder, wondering who’s sneaking up to replace you. You’ll be too busy concentrating on the steps above you.

Second. Perseverance. In the words of Coach Jimmy Valvano, “Don’t Give Up . . . Don’t Ever Give Up.” No matter how bad things are, they will improve if you just don’t give up. This doesn’t mean you won’t experience failures and setbacks. They’re inevitable. What it means is, despite your losses, despite those failures and setbacks, you need to pull yourself up and get on with your business. And when these things happen, refer to the previous paragraph; learn. Turn that sow’s ear into your very own silk purse; defeat into victory. You can do it.

I hope some of what I’ve written here will be of use to you. If you are in the intended audience for these “If I were 22” posts, you’ve got your entire career ahead of you. Keep your eyes and ears open. You don’t need to plan every step; serendipity is a wonderful thing. As you can see from the picture of my Law School graduation in 1976, above, I also think it’s important to not take oneself too seriously. Enjoy your lives and make others happy. Good luck out there.


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